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List of lists(for pdf)_2005(final).qxp

Pesticide Action Network UK
A catalogue of lists of pesticides identifying those associated with particularly harmful health or environmental impacts Contents
Pesticides included in international conventions and the PAN Dirty Dozen World Health Organisation hazard classifications WWF list of pesticides in the environment with reproductive and/or endocrine disrupting effects 9 Pesticides in the Marine Environment of the North-East Atlantic (OSPAR Convention) 10 OSPAR Convention substances of concern Regulating water in Europe: Water Framework Directive and Dangerous Substances Directive Pesticides banned or severely restricted in the European Union Phasing out pesticides in Europe under Agricultural Pesticides Directive 91/414/EEC 18 Web resources that support this List of Lists Introduction
Pesticides are chemicals designed to kill or Convention information on such national action control insects, weeds, diseases and other will be circulated, and the treaty offers potential to unwanted organisms. Over 800 active ingredients prohibit imports of certain chemicals.
are sold worldwide in tens of thousands of Final decisions about which pesticides can be formulations. Products are widely used in used are primarily taken at country level or by a agriculture, public health, domestic and urban areas. Many pesticides have been found to be introduced pesticide use reduction programmes harmful to human and animal health or to the to encourage an overall decrease in dependence, environment, and this briefing has proved to be a or replacement if less risky pest management popular resource for identifying these.
products or strategies are available. Appearance The 2005 edition of the List of Lists has been fully on a prescribed list may assist authorities to revised and updated. Since 2002, the European prioritise pesticides to review or take actions to Union (EU) has identified over 60 additional active mitigate risks. It should be noted that certain ingredients as possible endocrine disruptors. Few pesticides on these lists are no longer produced authorities concur on these pesticides, however or used, while many remain in widespread use.
Pesticide Action Network UKpromotes healthy food, the four selected here now agree on atrazine, While compiled primarily from official sources, DDT, lindane and tributyltin. The List includes new two lists from public interest organisations are information from the EU on the Water Framework included: the PAN Dirty Dozen and the WWF Directive, bans and severe restrictions, and the full endocrine disrupting chemicals lists, which have list of ‘risk phrases’ that appear on labels.
been influential in drawing attention to hazards.
Some pesticides have been identified as a global This material is meant for information and should concern. International and regional bodies have not be interpreted as advice, recommendations identified others for potential to cause cancer, or guidance. We have made every effort to check disrupt hormonal systems, or be acutely toxic.
accuracy. We will periodically update the briefing National concerns may lead to a government ban and welcome corrections and additions.
or severe restriction. Under the recent Rotterdam The Rotterdam Convention on PriorInformed Consent (PIC) Pesticides included in international conventions and the
This convention entered into legal PAN dirty dozen
PAN Dirty
early warning system about allbans and severe restrictions on Active ingredient
2,4,5-T and its salts and esters (dioxin contamination) importing countries must indicatewhether they allow or prohibit ensure compliance. It currentlyincludes 37 chemicals: 24 pesticides, four severely hazardous pesticide formulations, (six until 1/1/2006 - note 2)and 11 industrial The Stockholm Convention onPersistent Organic Pollutants 1,2-Dibromoethane (EDB, or Ethylene dibromide) DNOC (dinitro-ortho-cresol) and its salts - ammonium, potassium, sodium This convention entered into legal force in May 2004. It currentlycovers 12 chemicals, including eliminate or reduce release into the produced POPs. It aims ultimatelyto eliminate releases of Mercury compounds, including inorganic mercury compounds, alkyl mercury compounds and alkyloxyalkyl and aryl mercury compounds elimination, with a phase outperiod for DDT (allowed use: indoor control of malaria vectors). Many POPs remain in stockpilesand require safe disposal. Source: Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), except mono-and dichlorinated (3) The Convention on Long-rangeTransboundary Air Pollution Pentachlorophenol and its salts and esters This convention of the UNEconomic Commission for Europe The following severely hazardous formulations are in PIC
Dustable powder formulations containing a combination of: benomyl at or above 7 per cent, carbofuran at above 10 per cent, Convention. Of 45 countries in theregion, 23 have ratified. LRTAP Methamidophos 600 g/l (SL) formulation and higher Phosphamidon 1000 g/l (SL) formulation and higher and lindane as one), two industrialchemicals and three byproducts or Methyl parathion emulsifiable concentrates (EC) with 19.5%, 50%, 50%, 60% active ingredients and dusts containing 1.5%, 2% and (1) Methyl Bromide is an ozone-depleting pesticide covered by the Montreal Protocol on ozone-depleting substances, which requiresindustrialised countries to phase out its use by 2005, with a period of grace for developing countries to 2015. The pesticide is still widelyused as a fumigant and soil sterilant, and industrial countries apply for extension of its use. (2) Monocrotophos and parathion were included in PIC as severely hazardous formulations, but are now included as active intgredients on the basis of two bans in two different parts of the world. From 1 January 2006 they were no longer included as formulations. initiative. Its aim was to bringattention to and stop the use of (3) Industrial chemicals in PIC: Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are included in PIC as industrial chemicals., as are asbestos (actinolite, anthophyllite, amosite, crocidolite, tremolite), polybrominated biphenyls (PBB), polychlorinated terphenyls (PCT), tetraethyl lead, tetramethyl lead, tris (2,3-dibromopropyl) phosphate. * POPs - WWF has identified an additional 20 chemicals to be added to the convention, of which seven are pesticides chlordecone, hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH)/lindane, pentachlorophenol, endosulfan, hexachlorobutadiene, dicofol, methoxychlor. Source: Stockholm Convention: “New POPs” Screening Additional POPs candidates, WWF, April 2005, and paraquat - are not yet subject http://www.worldwildlife.org/toxics/pubs/New_POPs_FINAL.pdf World Health Organisation hazard classifications
The WHO classification measures acute toxicity. FAO recommends that WHO Ia and Ib pesticides
should not be used in developing countries, and if possible class II should also be avoided. Note that a
'weaker' formulation will move these active ingredients into a lower hazard classification.
Extremely Hazardous
Highly Hazardous
Gaseous or volatile
fumigants
Moderately Hazardous
http://www.who.int/ipcs/publication LD50 for the rat (mg/kg body weight) Unlikely to present acute hazard in normal use: “WHO Table 5” Active ingredients believed to be obsolete or discontinued for use as pesticides The terms ‘solid’ and ‘liquids’ refer to the physical state of the active ingredient. The LD50 value is a statistical estimate of the number of mg of toxicant per kg of bodyweight required to kill 50% of a large population of test animals. Organophosphate pesticides
Organophosphates (OPs) are the most widely used group of insecticides in the world and many of
these do not appear on restricted lists. They are among the most acutely toxic of all pesticides to both
insect pests, and to vertebrate animals and humans. OPs are hazardous both to professional and
amateur users. They are regularly detected in food items such as fruit and vegetables, sometimes
above a safety level known as the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI). In the FAO / WHO Joint Meeting on
Pesticides Residues (JMPR), concerns were expressed that the ADI derived from subchronic or long-
term studies may not be the ideal benchmark for assessing risk posed by short-term exposure to
acutely toxic residues, including OPs. JMPR established an Acute Reference Dose (ARfD), defined as ‘an
estimate of a substance in food or drinking water, expressed on body weight basis, that can be
ingested over a short period of time, usually during one meal or one day, without appreciable health
risk to the consumer on the basis of all known facts at the time of evaluation.’ An ARfD has not yet been
established for all pesticide / food combinations.
Active Ingredient
WHO Class
Active Ingredient
WHO Class
Obsolete
This list is taken from PAN UK’s classification of active pesticide Pesticides and cancer
This list cites potential pesticide carcinogens from the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the European Union (EU) found in public documents. In 1993, Pesticides News listed 70 possible carcinogens – now the list has grown to over160. Many of the pesticides included are obsolete chemicals but may be found in stockpiles. Other pesticides are still in use, especially those cited by the US EPA. For some pesticides, like DDT, there is classification systems in recentyears. Some categories have agreement about carcinogenic potential, but with many others authorities do not agree on the risks.
The information supplied is taken from a range of sources, and it has not been easy to locate therelevant information. Indeed there are some inconsistencies and inaccuracies between and within the source documents. We invite comment, and hope that this information helps to stimulate international debate on how regulators deal with potentially carcinogenic pesticides.
Group B = Probable HumanCarcinogen: B1 indicates limitedhuman evidence; B2 indicates Active ingredient
Active ingredient
sufficient evidence in animals and Known/Likely available tumoureffects and other key data are carcinogenicity, but not sufficient to humans - evidence thatcarcinogenic effets are not Potential, US EPA, [see details at www.epa.gov/pesticides/carlist/although list not available on *'These active ingredients arelisted in the PAN North America Active ingredient
Active ingredient
There is no single EU list available subsequent amendments providethe classification of dangerous adapting to technical progress for administrative provisions relating to the classification, packaging and Breakdown products (B), impurities (I),
solvents (So) and synergists (Sy)
Pesticide groups
Arsenic (acid, pentoxide and arsenate, sodium) Chromium VI compounds (insecticides, fungicides and wood preservatives) Non-arsenical insecticides (occupational exposures) Endocrine disrupting pesticides
= identified according todefinitions below Some pesticides are suspected of being endocrine disruptors. These chemicals affect parts of thehormonal system, and can lead to birth defects, sexual abnormalities and reproductive failure.
Regulators do not agree on the list of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC). This list shows that four official sources agree only on atrazine, DDT, lindane and tributyltin. In May 2005 international experts and scientists representing different disciplines convened in Prague to discuss European research on EDCs, known as the cluster for research on endocrine disrupters (CREDO). The results reinforced concerns over the long-term consequences of exposure to endocrine disrupters to humans and wildlife (see the Prague Declaration on Endocrine Disruption www.edenresearch.info/declaration.html).
Active ingredient
Priority list of EDCs (category 1), Category 2. Potential forendocrine disruption. In vitro data indicating potential for endocrine Also includes effects in-vivo thatmay, or may not, be ED-mediated. Commission Staff WorknigDocument [Brussels, 28.10.2004 ment/endocrine/documents/sec_2004_1372_en.pdf 262 final] http://europa.eu.int/eur- pesticides of being EDCs, but they are not listed if no other authority above cited them. (For the full list WWF list of pesticides in the environment with reproductive
and/or endocrine disrupting effects

Herbicides 2,4-D, 2,4,5-T, acetochlor, alachlor, amitrole, atrazine, bromacil, bromoxynil, cyanazine, DCPA (dacthal),
ethiozin, glufosinate-ammonium, ioxynil, linuron, metribuzin, molinate, nitrofen, oryzalin, oxyacetmide/fluthamide (FOE 5043), paraquat, pendimethalin, picloram, prodiamine, pronamide, simazine, terbutryn, thiazopyr, triclorobenzene, trifluralin toxicants. In: Rom W N (ed)Environmental and Occupational Fungicides benomyl, etridiazole, fenarimol, fenbuconazole, hexachlorobenzene, mancozeb, maneb, metiram, nabam,
Medicine, Third edition, Lippincott-Raven Publishers, Philadelphia. penachloronitrobenzene, pentachlorophenol, triadimefon, tributyltin, vinclozolin, zineb, ziram 2. Brucker-Davis F, 1998, Effects of Insecticides aldicarb, aldrin, bifenthrin, carbaryl, carbofuran, chlordane, chlordecone, chlorfentezine, 8-cyhalothrin, DDT
environmental synthetic chemicalson thyroid function, Thyroid 8(9), and metabolites DDE, DDD, deltamethrin, dicofol, dieldrin, dimethoate, dinitrophenol, endosulfan (a and b), endrin, ethofenprox, fenitrothion, fenvalerate, fipronil, a-HCH, heptachlor and H-epoxide, lindane (g-HCH), malathion, methomyl, methoxychlor, mirex, oxychlordane, parathion (methylparathion), photomirex, pyrethrins, synthetic pyrethroids, ronnel Pesticide use in the US and policy implications: a focus on herbicides,Toxicol Ind Health 15(1/2), p240- Nematicide DBCP
Rodenticide n-2-fluorenylacetamide
Pesticides in the Marine Environment of the
North-East Atlantic (OSPAR Convention)

The 1992 OSPAR Convention for the Protection of the Marine Environment of the North-East Atlantic isthe current instrument guiding international cooperation on the protection of the marine environment ofthe North-East Atlantic. It combined and up-dated the 1972 Oslo Convention on dumping waste at seaand the 1974 Paris Convention on land-based sources of marine pollution. The work under theconvention is managed by the OSPAR Commission, made up of representatives of the Governments of15 Contracting Parties (Belgium, Denmark*, Finland*, France, Germany, Iceland*, Ireland,Luxembourg*, the Netherlands*, Norway*, Portugal, Spain*, Sweden*, Switzerland*, the UnitedKingdom*) and the European Commission, representing the European Community. Observers from 25non-governmental organisations, representing environmental groups and industry, also contribute to theCommission's work.
The pesticides agreed as 'priorities for action' are listed here (updated in 2004), as well as a list ofsubstances of 'possible concern' including 98 pesticides (updated in September 2005).
Additional notes
These compounds are generally extremely toxic, causing acute toxicity, cancer, reproductive and developmental toxicity. Previous use as a pesticide.
Dicofol is supplied in the European Union at levels greater than 1 000 tonnes/annum for use as a acaricide. The substance is highly toxic to aquatic organisms, bioaccumulative and will not degrade rapidly in the aquatic environment. It is currently not on a priority list for assessment under the EC Plant Protection Products Directive. Potential for endocrine disrupting effects, dicofol.** Endosulfan is produced in high volume in the European Union for use as an insecticide. It is very highly toxic, bioaccumulative and not easily degradable. Monitoring programmes detected this substance in surface waters. Potential for endocrine disrupting effects.** Hexachlorocyclohexane (Note: a synonym for the common name for mixed isomers is benzene hexachloride (BHC); common name for the gamma isomer is gamma-HCH or gamma-BHC; synonym for the 99% gamma isomer, which still has pesticide uses, is lindane) Methoxychlor is used principally as an insecticide, although production and use volumes are now thought to be low. It has been found in surface waters. Methoxychlor shows very high toxicity to aquatic species, is highly bioaccumulative and does not degrade easily in the aquatic environment. It is structurally analogous to DDT.** This substance is used as an intermediate in chemical synthesis, in termite treatment and as a degreasing solvent. It is produced in high volume in the European Union. It has been included in the first Priority List for action under the EU Water Framework Directive and has been assessed under the Existing Substances Regulation of the European Community. Monitoring studies detected this substance in surface waters. It has a high toxicity to aquatic organisms, is bioaccumulative and does not easily degrade in the environment, and thus gives rise to concerns This substance is used as an intermediate in chemical synthesis, in termite treatment and as a degreasing solvent. It has been included in the first Priority List for action under the EU Water Framework Directive. It has been found in monitoring studies in surface waters. The substance has high toxicity to aquatic organisms, is bioaccumulative and does not easily degrade in the environment, and thus gives rise to concerns arising from long-term exposures.** This substance is used as an intermediate in chemical synthesis, in termite treatment and as a degreasing solvent. It has been included in the first Priority List for action under the EU Water Framework Directive. It has been detected in monitoring studies in surface waters. The substance has high toxicity to aquatic organisms, is bioaccumulative and does not easily degrade in the environment, and thus gives rise to concerns arising from long-term exposures.** Mercury and organic mercury: all pesticide uses banned in Europe.
(NP/NPEs) and related substances: nonylphenol ethoxylate 9-ETO is used as an adjuvant in Previous pesticide uses noted as a fungicide, bactericide and preservative (sic) (organotin compounds) These include tributyltin pesticides used as antifoulants, microbiocides with some substances used as a fungicide (tributyltin fluoride) and as a Pentachlorophenol (PCP) Introduced in 1936 as a timber preservative, also used as an insecticide, fungicide, non-selective contact herbicide and general disinfectant. Very persistent in the environment.
Polychlorinated biphenyls PCBs substances: One pesticide (arochlor) is a PCB.
Trifluralin is a dinitroaniline herbicide used to control a wide spectrum of annual grasses and broadleaf weeds in agriculture, horticulture, viticulture, amenity and home garden. The major crops it is used on are oilseed rape and sunflowers and, to a lesser extent, cotton and cereals.
Trifluralin was added to the OSPAR List of Chemicals for Priority action in 2002.
OSPAR List of Chemicals forPriority Action (Update 2004),Reference number 2004-12, * These countries have ratified the Convention. ** Details on these substances from OSPAR Commission. Sources for additional information on other substances: Pesticide Action Network Pesticide Database (http://data.pesticideinfo.org/) and The Pesticide Manual, Twelfth Edition, Editor CDS Tomlin, British Crop Protection Council, UK, 2000. OSPAR Convention - Substances of concern
The OSPAR List of Substances of Possible Concern is a dynamic working list and will be regularly
revised as new information becomes available. This may lead to exclusion of substances present on
the current version and to inclusion of other substances if data on persistence, toxicity and liability to
bioaccumulate (or evidence that they give rise to an equivalent level of concern) show that they should
be added. This version of the OSPAR List of Substances of Possible Concern was last revised on 21
September 2005.
Pesticide
Pesticide
[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-ol, 3,5-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)- propanoic acid, 2-(2,4,5-trichlorophenoxy)-, 2- phosphorodithioic acid, O,O-diisooctyl ester 2,2,5-endo,6-exo,8,9,10-heptachloronorbornane 1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione, 1,3,5-t oxirane, 2-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-2-(2,2,2-t phosphorothioic acid, O,O,O-tris(4-nitrophenyl) (diethylamino)-2-ethoxyphenyl]-5-(1-ethyl-2- Regulating water in Europe
Regulation of water in Europe is in the process of change. Community policy on pollution caused by certain dangerous or hazardous substances in European waters was introduced three decades ago. The The first list of priority hazardous Dangerous Substances Directive 76/464/EEC of 4 May 1976 had the ambitious objective of regulating potential aquatic pollution by thousands of chemicals produced in Europe at that time. Community water policy has been restructured under the Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC) (WFD), adopted in September 2000. Directive 76/464 is being integrated in the WFD, and will be fully repealed in 2013.
phasing out of discharges,emissions and losses within an Directive 76/464 covers discharges to inland surface waters, territorial waters, inland coastal waters. It originally covered protection of groundwater, but this was removed in 1980 and regulated under the separate Council Directive 80/68/EEC on the protection of groundwater against pollution caused by certain dangerous substances. The priority substances for control under 76/464 were grouped under candidate Lists I and II, with the aim of eliminating pollution from List I substances and reducing pollution from List II substances. List I represents chemicals of greatest concern which were regulated in the 1980s at European level. List II substances (candidates for List 1) were required to be regulated nationally.
priorities, and other hazardoussubstances have been identified. The WFD has identified priority lists, and the European Commission is developing a proposal forregulating these substances, which is expected to be presented in 2006. The WFD list of prioritysubstances has replaced ‘candidate List I’ (now List II) of 1982, but includes only a minority of List 1substances. The WFD opens with a number of Recitals that indicate its intention. Recital 51 says that the aim of the “implementation of this Directive is to achieve a level of protection of waters at least equivalent to that provided in certain earlier acts, which should therefore be repealed once the relevant provisions of the WFD have been fully implemented.” Recital 53 refers to the fact that full implementation and enforcement of existing environmental legislation for the protection of waters should be ensured. Collectively, the Recitals certain individual substances were of the WFD seek to maintain a standard of water quality at least equivalent to that existing under present to be selected on the basis of their EC law. Article 1(c) "aims at enhanced protection and improvement of the aquatic environment ." It is vital therefore that the substances identified under 76/464, and the standards it established, are fully integrated into the WFD before this earlier Directive is repealed.
individual substances have beenregulated under specific Directives(see table), known as ‘daughter Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC
directives’, setting emission limitvalues and quality objectives at Priority hazardous
Possible priority
Other substances on
Community level. List II (formerlycalled ‘candidate List I’) includes substances
hazardous substances
that have a deleterious effect onthe aquatic environment, that are Member States must establishpollution reduction programmes including water quality objectives has been slow, and theCommission began infringementprocedures against Member Dangerous Substances Directive 76/464/EEC
States, most of which are beforethe European Court of Justice.
There have been several rulings
List I substances
Triphenyltin hydroxide (Fentin hydroxide) Candidate list I
substances - now list II
Candidate list I
substances (‘99
substances’) - now list II
2,4-D (incl 2,4-D-salts and 2,4-D-esters) Pesticides banned or severely restricted in the
European Union
Note: Pesticides that are severely restricted may have been granted an extension (or derogation) for Prohibits placing on the market and essential use under Directive 91/414 (see page 14).
use of plant protection productscontaining certain active EU Use limitation
Regulation / Directive (Decision*)
substances which, even if applied inan approved manner, could give This regulation of 28 January 2003 notification of importers of anyproducts banned under Directive 79/117 or included in a PIC list of Dicofol containing more than 78% p,p*-Dicofol severely restrict any chemicals but or 1 g/kg of DDT and DDT related compounds under other EU legislation(Directives 79/117/EEC, Ethylene oxide (will be evaluated under biocides directive) Agricultural ban HCH containing less than 99.0% of the gamma isomer Maleic hydrazide and its salts, other than choline, used in the EU. Certain pesticides potassium and sodium salts; choline, potassium and in 304/2003 were not notified under of sodium salts maleic hydrazide containing more than 1 mg/kg of freehydrazine expressed on the basis Mercury compounds including mercuric oxide, mercurous chloride (calomel): other inorganic mercury compounds: of 91/414, and are thus effectively alkyl mercury compounds: and alkoxyalkyl and aryl 2,4,5-T, monotocrotophos. Manyother pesticides have not been restriction, and they would beincluded in Annex 1 of Regulation concentration equal to or greaterthan 0.1% by mass, except in intended for use in industrialinstallations: in the treatment of Triorganostannic compounds (tributyltin compounds) heavy-duty textiles; as asynthesising and/or processing * Brackets () represents the Commission Decision number excluding this active ingredient from Annex 1 of 91/414.
** Have been granted essential use derogations (see p 14) production is banned underDirective 76/769/EEC Phasing out pesticides in Europe under
Agricultural Pesticides Directive 91/414/EEC

In an ambitious work programme launched in 1992, the European Commission started a Community-wide review process for all active ingredients used in plant protection products (pesticides) within theEuropean Union. In a review process based on scientific assessments, each applicant had to prove that asubstance could be used safely regarding human health, the environment, ecotoxicology and residuesin the food chain. If a pesticide is approved under 91/414/EEC it is placed on Annex 1 of the Directive,and may be used throughout Member States. This and the following pages list those that have failed thereview process and are not listed on Annex 1. The pesticides on page 14 have been granted a limitedextension of use on certain crops until the end of December 2007 when they must come off the market.
Those on page 15 have failed to make it onto Annex 1 and have been withdrawn from the market. Insome cases this may be because the manufacturer has not supplied the data required to extendregistration. In some cases the pesticide has been banned (see page 13). This programme should becompleted by 2008. The information here indicates the type of use, the date it came off the market andthe relevant decision making directive.
Pesticides withdrawn from the EU with ‘essential use’ derogations
Pesticides with essential uses have not been given EU-wide approval. Certain countries have been given an extension (or derogation) for one or more essential uses for the active ingredient on specific crops until December 2007. Member States are expected to explore alternatives to their use and to report on progress in substituting less harmful products or methods.
Alkyltrimethylbenzyl ammonium chloride HB Out 7/03 Furalaxyl FU Out 7/03 essential use 2076/2002 Furathiocarb IN Out 7/03 essential use 835/04, 2076/2002 2-Aminobutane (aka sec-butylamine) FU Out 7/03 essential Haloxyfop HB Out 7/03 essential 2076/2002 Heptenophos IN Out 7/03 essential use 2076/2002 4-CPA (4-chlorophenoxyaceticacid = PCPA) PG Out 7/03 Hexazinone HB Out 7/03 essential use 835/04, 2076/2002 Imazamethabenz HB No Dossier essential use Voted Out Aldicarb NE,IN,AC Out 09/04 essential uses 03/199 Acifluorfen HB Out 7/03 essential use 2076/2002 Imazapyr HB Out 7/03 essential use 835/04, 2076/2002 Anthracene oil IN,AC,HB,RO Out 7/03 essential use Iminoctadine FU Out 7/03 essential use 835/04, Atrazine HB Out 10/04 essential use 835/2004, 04/247 Kasugamycin FU,BA No Dossier essential use Voted Out Azaconazole IN,FU Out 7/03 essential use 835/04, Mepronil FU Out 7/03 essential use 2076/2002 Benfuresate HB Out 7/03 essential use 2076/2002 Methidathion IN,AC Out 12/04 essential use 835/04, Benomyl FU Out 05/03 derogation HU (771/2004) essential Metobromuron HB Out 7/03 essential use 2076/2002 Bensultap IN Out 7/03 essential use 835/04, 2076/2002 Metoxuron HB Out 7/03 essential use 2076/2002 Bromacil HB Out 7/03 essential use 2076/2002 Naptalam HB Out 7/03 essential use 835/04, 2076/2002 Bromopropylate AC Out 7/03 essential use 835/04, Omethoate IN,AC Out 7/03 essential 2076/2002 Orbencarb HB Out 7/03 essential use 2076/2002 Butylate HB Out 07/03 derogation HU (771/2004) Oxadixyl FU Out 7/03 essential use 2076/2002 Oxine-copper FU Out 7/03 essential use 835/04, Calcium hydroxide (aka slake lime) Out 7/03 essential use http://europa.eu.int/comm/food/pla nt/protection/evaluation/stat_active_ Oxycarboxin FU Out 7/03 essential use 835/04, 2076/2002 Cartap IN Out 7/03 essential use 2076/2002 Pebulate HB Out 7/03 essential use 2076/2002 Chinomethionat (aka quinomethionate) AC,FU Out 7/03 Pentanochlor HB Out 7/03 essential use 2076/2002 Polyoxin FU No Dossier essential use Voted Out SCFA Chlorfenvinphos IN Out 7/03 essential use 835/04 Prometryne HB Out 7/03 essential use 835/04, 2076/2002 Cresylic acid ST,FU No Dossier Voted Out SCFA 29-6-04 Pyridafenthion IN,AC Out 7/03 essential 2076/2002 Cyanazine HB Out 7/03 essential use 835/04, 2076/2002 Resmethrin IN Out 7/03 essential use 2076/2002 Cycloate HB Out 07/03 derogation HU (771/2004) Rock powder Out 7/03 essential use 2076/2002 Sethoxydim HB Out 7/03 essential use 2076/2002 Dalapon HB Out 7/03 essential use 2076/2002 Silver nitrate PG,FU Out 7/03 essential use 2076/2002 Dichlorophen HB,FU No Dossier essential use Voted Out Simazine HB Out 10/04 essential use 835/2004, 04/247 Sodium dimethylarsinate RO Out 7/03 essential use Dichlorprop HB Out 7/03 essential use 835/04, 2076/2002 Dikegulac PG Out 7/03 essential use 2076/2002 Sodium monochloroacetate HB Out 7/03 essential use Dimefuron HB Out 7/03 essential use 2076/2002 Dinobuton AC,FU Out 7/03 essential use 2076/2002 Sulfotep IN,AC Out 7/03 essential 2076/2002 Disodium octaborate tetrahydrate HB Out 7/03 essential Tar acids IN Out 7/03 essential use 2076/2002 EPTC (ethyl dipropylthiocarbamate) HB Out 07/03 Terbacil HB Out 7/03 essential use 835/04, 2076/2002 Terbufos IN Out 7/03 essential use 835/04, 2076/2002 Ethion (aka diethion) IN,AC Out 7/03 essential use Terbutryn HB Out 7/03 essential use 835/04, 2076/2002 Tetradifon AC,IN Out 7/03 essential use 2076/2002 Fenpropathrin IN,AC Out 7/03 essential use 2076/2002 Thiocyclam IN Out 7/03 essential use 835/04, 2076/2002 Fenuron HB Out 7/03 essential use 2076/2002 Triazophos IN,AC Out 7/03 essential use 2076/2002 Flumethralin PG Out 7/03 essential use 2076/2002 Triforine FU,AC Out 7/03 essential use 835/04, 2076/2002 Fomesafen HB Out 7/03 essential use 2076/2002 Vamidothion IN,AC Out 7/03 essential use 2076/2002 Fosamine E Out 7/03 essential use 2076/2002 362 Substances where registration has been withdrawn under 91/414/EEC
and its amendments

These pesticides can no longer be used in Member States. In some cases no manufacturer applied for registration; in some casesthe active ingredient has been banned or severely restricted (see page 13) http://europa.eu.int/comm/food/fs/p h_ps/pro/eva/existing/exis02_en.pd European Union Risk Phrases
European Union (EU) requires that risk phrases (R-phrases) appear on each label and safety datasheet for hazardous chemicals. R-phrases consist of the letter R followed by a number. The precisemeaning of each of these appears below (see www.ilpi.com/msds/ref/riskphrases.html) Labels will also have symbols or pictograms, but the R-phrase specifies the particular danger(s). Forexample, sodium metal may have a large F and flame icon on the label, but the particular risk isdenoted by R14/15 and R34 which correspond to "Reacts violently with water liberating highlyflammable gases" and "causes burns".
Safety phrases (S-phrases) for handling precautions are also part of the same requirements (seewww.ilpi.com/msds/ref/safetyphrases.html).
More than one R-phrase may appear on a Materials Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). These are usuallypresented in combination, such as R36/37/38. In the first table below, single phrases are given, and inthe second table, combinations are given. In general, no more than four R-phrases should be sufficientto adequately communicate the risks of a particular material. The R-phrases selected should be thoseapplicable to the substance(s) present in the concentration which gives rise to the most severeclassification.
Single Risk Phrases
Contact with water liberates toxic gases.
Risk of explosion by shock, friction, fire or Contact with acids liberates toxic gas.
Extreme risk of explosion by shock, friction, Contact with acids liberates Very toxic gas.
Explosive with or without contact with air.
Danger of very serious irreversible effects.
Possible risks of irreversible effects.
May cause sensitization by inhalation.
May cause sensitization by skin contact.
Extremely flammable liquified gas. This code May cause long-term adverse effects in the May cause long-term adverse effects in the Multiple Risk Phrases
Harmful by inhalation and if swallowed.
R40/20/21/22 Harmful: possible risk of irreversible Toxic by inhalation and if swallowed.
Toxic by inhalation, in contact with skin Toxic in contact with skin and if swallowed.
Very toxic by inhalation, in contact with Irritating to eyes and respiratory system.
Irritating to eyes, respiratory system and inhalation and in contact with skin.
Irritating to respiratory system and skin.
Toxic: danger of very serious irreversible Toxic: danger of very serious irreversible Toxic: danger of very serious irreversible R48/20/21/22 Harmful: danger of serious damage to Toxic: danger of very serious irreversible Toxic: danger of very serious irreversible Toxic: danger of very serious irreversible R39/23/24/25 Toxic: danger of very serious irreversible irreversible effects through inhalation.
inhalation and in contact with skin.
irreversible effects in contact with skin.
R48/23/24/25 Toxic: danger of serious damage to irreversible effects in contact with skin R39/26/27/28 Very toxic: danger of very serious irreversible effects through inhalation, in Web resources that support this List of Lists
The information in this document was accurate at the time of printing. However for the most up-to-date
data it is best to visit the sites of those organisations responsible for the various classifications.
International organisations
on human toxicity (chronic and acute),ecotoxicity and regulatory information http://www.pesticides.gov.uk/prc_home.asp products (the form of the pesticide thatgrowers and consumers purchase for use) containing the active ingredients.
Academic
disruption http://www.ourstolenfuture.org/ Methyl bromide
http://ace.ace.orst.edu/info/extoxnet/ghind http://extoxnet.orst.edu/pips/ghindex.html Governments
Obsolete pesticides
Active ingredients
http://europa.eu.int/comm/agriculture/ind DGEnvironmenthttp://europa.eu.int/comm/environment/in Persistent Organochlorine
Pollutants (POPs)
http://europa.eu.int/comm/dgs/health_consu Prior Informed Consent (PIC)
Endocrine disruption
Pesticide Action Network UK, Development House, 56 - 64 leonard Street, London EC2A 4JX, UK Tel: +44 (0)20 7065 0905, Fax: +44 (0)20 7065 0907, Email: admin@pan-uk.org, www.pan-uk.org

Source: http://www.tca.or.tz/docs/PAN-%20THE%20LIST%20OF%20LISTS.pdf

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Curriculum vitae - rak, janusz

CURRICULUM VITAE – RAK, Janusz Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, Division of Oncology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada. Faculty of Health Sciences , Graduate Faculty of Hemostasis, Thrombembolism and Atherosclerosis. McMaster University. Associated Graduate Faculty at the Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Guelph. Address. Henderson Research Centre. De

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