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St. john’s wort

This fact sheet provides basic information about the herb St. John’s wort—common names, uses, potential side effects, and resources for more information. St. John’s wort is a plant with yellow flowers whose medicinal uses were first recorded in ancient Greece. The name St. John’s wort apparently refers to John the Baptist, as the plant blooms around the time of the feast of St. John the Baptist in late June. Common Names—St. John’s wort, hypericum, Klamath weed, goatweed. Latin Name—Hypericum perforatum What It Is Used For  St. John’s wort has been used for centuries to treat mental disorders  St. John’s wort has also been used as a sedative and a treatment for malaria, as well as a balm for wounds, burns, and insect bites.  Today, St. John’s wort is used by some for depression, anxiety, The flowering tops of St. John’s wort are used to prepare teas, tablets, and capsules containing concentrated extracts. Liquid extracts and topical preparations are also used. What the Science Says  There is scientific evidence that St. John’s wort may be useful for short-term treatment of mild to moderate depression. Although some studies have reported benefits for more severe depression, others have not; for example, a large study sponsored by NCCAM found that the herb was no more effective than placebo in treating major depression of moderate severity.  NCCAM is studying the use of St. John’s wort in a wider spectrum of mood disorders, including minor depression. Side Effects and Cautions  St. John’s wort may cause increased sensitivity to sunlight. Other side effects can include anxiety, dry mouth, dizziness, gastrointestinal symptoms, fatigue, headache, or sexual dysfunction.  Research has shown that St. John’s wort interacts with many medications in ways that can interfere with their intended effects. Examples of medications that can be affected include: o Antidepressants o Birth control pills o Cyclosporine, which prevents the body from rejecting transplanted organs o Digoxin, a heart medication o Indinavir and possibly other drugs used to control HIV infection o Irinotecan and possibly other drugs used to treat cancer o Seizure-control drugs, such as dilantin and phenobarbital o Warfarin and related anticoagulants.  Taking St. John’s wort with certain antidepressants may lead to increased serotonin-related side effects,  St. John’s wort is not a proven therapy for depression. If depression is not adequately treated, it can become severe. Anyone who may have depression should see a health care provider. There are effective proven therapies available.  Tell all your health care providers about any complementary and alternative practices you use. Give them a full picture of what you do to manage your health. This will help ensure coordinated and safe care. For tips about talking with your health care providers about CAM, see NCCAM’s Time to Talk campaign at De Smet PA. Herbal remedies. New England Journal of Medicine. 2002;347(25):2046-2056. Hypericum Depression Trial Study Group. Effect of Hypericum perforatum (St. John’s wort) in major depressive disorder: a randomized controlled trial. Journal of the American Medical Association. 2002;287(14):1807-1814. National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. St. John’s Wort and Depression. National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Web siten June 3, 2010. St. John’s wort. Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Web site. Accessed St. John’s wort. In: Blumenthal M, Goldberg A, Brinckman J, eds. Herbal Medicine: Expanded Commission E Monographs. Newton, MA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2000:359-366. St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum L.). Natural Standard Database Web site. Accessedy 15, 2010. Visit the NCCAM Web siand view Using Dietary Supplements Wisely. TTY (for deaf and hard-of-hearing callers): 1-866-464-3615 NIH National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus This publication is not copyrighted and is in the public domain. Duplication is encouraged. NCCAM has provided this material for your information. It is not intended to substitute for the medical expertise and advice of your primary health care provider. We encourage you to discuss any decisions about treatment or care with your health care provider. The mention of any product, service, or therapy is not an endorsement by NCCAM. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services D269 Created July 2005 Updated July 2010

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Module i: overview of complementary & alternative medicine

Complementary and Alternative Medicine Online Continuing Education Series NCCAM CHAPTER I: OVERVIEW OF COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE Let’s drill down and talk a little more about some of the approaches, some of the potential hazards, and some of the opportunities. I’m going to go back to those CAM domains again; I mentioned 5 of them, and you have the wheel in the upper lef

Microsoft word - paoct06

MESOAMERICA Volume 25, Number 10, October 2006 Mysterious Illness Kills 21 Panamanians On 3 Oct, public health officials in Panama called in experts from the Pan American Health Organiza- tion (Washington, DC) and the Center for Disease Control (CDC in Atlanta, Georgia) to investigate a mysterious illness that already had killed more than a dozen elderly patients after they e

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