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Chemwatch australian msds 5093-30

EVIC 853-859A SPRAYTHANE TEXTURED POLYURETHANE PART A
Chemwatch Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 26-Sep-2008

CHEMWATCH 5093-30
Version No:4
CD 2008/4 Page 1 of 19
Section 1 - CHEMICAL PRODUCT AND COMPANY IDENTIFICATION
PRODUCT NAME
EVIC 853-859A SPRAYTHANE TEXTURED POLYURETHANE PART A
PROPER SHIPPING NAME
PAINT RELATED MATERIAL
PRODUCT USE
» The use of a quantity of material in an unventilated or confined space may result in increased exposure and an
irritating atmosphere developing.
Before starting consider control of exposure by mechanical ventilation.
Base or Part A of a 2 pack.
urethane coating system.
Requires that the two parts be mixed by hand or mixer before use, in accordance with manufacturers directions. Mix only as much as is required. Do not return the mixed material to the original containers.
Application is usually by spray atomisation.
For kitchen doors, vanities and similar surfaces requiring a hard wearingtextured surface SUPPLIER
Company: Evic Pty Ltd
Address:
20 Lancaster Street
Ingleburn
NSW, 2565
AUS
Telephone: +61 2 9829 2288
Telephone: 1800 251 633
Fax: +61 2 9829 1612
Section 2 - HAZARDS IDENTIFICATION
STATEMENT OF HAZARDOUS NATURE
HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE. DANGEROUS GOODS. According to the Criteria of NOHSC,
and the ADG Code.

CHEMWATCH HAZARD RATINGS
continued.
EVIC 853-859A SPRAYTHANE TEXTURED POLYURETHANE PART A
Chemwatch Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 26-Sep-2008

CHEMWATCH 5093-30
Version No:4
CD 2008/4 Page 2 of 19
Section 2 - HAZARDS IDENTIFICATION
POISONS SCHEDULE
» Keep away from sources of ignition. No smoking.
» Do not breathe gas/fumes/vapour/spray.
contact with skin.
» Limited evidence of a carcinogenic » In case of insufficient ventilation wear suitable » Use only in well ventilated areas.
» May cause harm to the unborn child.
» Keep container in a well ventilated place.
» Avoid exposure - obtain special instructions before use.
swallowed.
» Vapours may cause drowsiness and » To clean the floor and all objects contaminated by this material use water and detergent.
» Keep container tightly closed.
» This material and its container must be disposed of in asafe way.
» Keep away from food drink and animal feeding stuffs.
» In case of contact with eyes rinse with plenty of waterand contact Doctor or Poisons Information Centre.
» This material and its container must be disposed of ashazardous waste.
Section 3 - COMPOSITION / INFORMATION ON INGREDIENTS
ingredients determined not to be hazardous Section 4 - FIRST AID MEASURES
SWALLOWED
• If swallowed do NOT induce vomiting.
• If vomiting occurs, lean patient forward or place on left side (head-down position, if possible) to maintain open
airway and prevent aspiration.
• Observe the patient carefully.
• Never give liquid to a person showing signs of being sleepy or with reduced awareness; i.e. becoming unconscious.
continued.
EVIC 853-859A SPRAYTHANE TEXTURED POLYURETHANE PART A
Chemwatch Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 26-Sep-2008

CHEMWATCH 5093-30
Version No:4
CD 2008/4 Page 3 of 19
Section 4 - FIRST AID MEASURES
• Give water to rinse out mouth, then provide liquid slowly and as much as casualty can comfortably drink.
• Seek medical advice.
• Avoid giving milk or oils.
• Avoid giving alcohol.
• If spontaneous vomiting appears imminent or occurs, hold patient's head down, lower than their hips to help avoid possible aspiration of vomitus.
EYE
» If this product comes in contact with the eyes:
• Wash out immediately with fresh running water.
• Ensure complete irrigation of the eye by keeping eyelids apart and away from eye and moving the eyelids by
occasionally lifting the upper and lower lids.
• If pain persists or recurs seek medical attention.
• Removal of contact lenses after an eye injury should only be undertaken by skilled personnel.
SKIN
» If skin contact occurs:
• Immediately remove all contaminated clothing, including footwear.
• Flush skin and hair with running water (and soap if available).
• Seek medical attention in event of irritation.
INHALED
• If fumes or combustion products are inhaled remove from contaminated area.
• Lay patient down. Keep warm and rested.
• Prostheses such as false teeth, which may block airway, should be removed, where possible, prior to initiating
first aid procedures.
• Apply artificial respiration if not breathing, preferably with a demand valve resuscitator, bag-valve mask device,
or pocket mask as trained. Perform CPR if necessary.
• Transport to hospital, or doctor.
NOTES TO PHYSICIAN
» Any material aspirated during vomiting may produce lung injury. Therefore emesis should not be induced
mechanically or pharmacologically. Mechanical means should be used if it is considered necessary to evacuate the
stomach contents; these include gastric lavage after endotracheal intubation. If spontaneous vomiting has occurred
after ingestion, the patient should be monitored for difficult breathing, as adverse effects of aspiration into the
lungs may be delayed up to 48 hours.
For acute or short term repeated exposures to petroleum distillates or related hydrocarbons:

Primary threat to life, from pure petroleum distillate ingestion and/or inhalation, is respiratory failure.
• Patients should be quickly evaluated for signs of respiratory distress (e.g. cyanosis, tachypnoea, intercostalretraction, obtundation) and given oxygen. Patients with inadequate tidal volumes or poor arterial blood gases (pO250 mm Hg) should be intubated.
• Arrhythmias complicate some hydrocarbon ingestion and/or inhalation and electrocardiographic evidence ofmyocardial injury has been reported; intravenous lines and cardiac monitors should be established in obviouslysymptomatic patients. The lungs excrete inhaled solvents, so that hyperventilation improves clearance.
• A chest x-ray should be taken immediately after stabilisation of breathing and circulation to document aspirationand detect the presence of pneumothorax.
• Epinephrine (adrenalin) is not recommended for treatment of bronchospasm because of potential myocardialsensitisation to catecholamines. Inhaled cardioselective bronchodilators (e.g. Alupent, Salbutamol) are thepreferred agents, with aminophylline a second choice.
• Lavage is indicated in patients who require decontamination; ensure use of cuffed endotracheal tube in adultpatients. [Ellenhorn and Barceloux: Medical Toxicology].
Section 5 - FIRE FIGHTING MEASURES
EXTINGUISHING MEDIA
• Foam.
• Dry chemical powder.
continued.
EVIC 853-859A SPRAYTHANE TEXTURED POLYURETHANE PART A
Chemwatch Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 26-Sep-2008

CHEMWATCH 5093-30
Version No:4
CD 2008/4 Page 4 of 19
Section 5 - FIRE FIGHTING MEASURES
• BCF (where regulations permit).
• Carbon dioxide.
• Water spray or fog - Large fires only.
FIRE FIGHTING
• Alert Fire Brigade and tell them location and nature of hazard.
• May be violently or explosively reactive.
• Wear breathing apparatus plus protective gloves.
• Prevent, by any means available, spillage from entering drains or water course.
• Consider evacuation (or protect in place).
• Fight fire from a safe distance, with adequate cover.
• If safe, switch off electrical equipment until vapour fire hazard removed.
• Use water delivered as a fine spray to control the fire and cool adjacent area.
• Avoid spraying water onto liquid pools.
• Do not approach containers suspected to be hot.
• Cool fire exposed containers with water spray from a protected location.
• If safe to do so, remove containers from path of fire.
FIRE/EXPLOSION HAZARD
• Liquid and vapour are highly flammable.
• Severe fire hazard when exposed to heat, flame and/or oxidisers.
• Vapour may travel a considerable distance to source of ignition.
• Heating may cause expansion or decomposition leading to violent rupture of containers.
• On combustion, may emit toxic fumes of carbon monoxide (CO).
Combustion products include: carbon dioxide (CO2), other pyrolysis products typical of burning organic material.
Contains low boiling substance: Closed containers may rupture due to pressure
buildup under fire conditions.
FIRE INCOMPATIBILITY
• Avoid contamination with oxidising agents i.e. nitrates, oxidising acids, chlorine bleaches, pool chlorine etc. as
ignition may result.
HAZCHEM: None
Section 6 - ACCIDENTAL RELEASE MEASURES
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
MINOR SPILLS
• Remove all ignition sources.
• Clean up all spills immediately.
• Avoid breathing vapours and contact with skin and eyes.
• Control personal contact by using protective equipment.
• Contain and absorb small quantities with vermiculite or other absorbent material.
• Wipe up.
• Collect residues in a flammable waste container.
MAJOR SPILLS
» Chemical Class: aromatic hydrocarbons
For release onto land: recommended sorbents listed in order of priority.
continued.
EVIC 853-859A SPRAYTHANE TEXTURED POLYURETHANE PART A
Chemwatch Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 26-Sep-2008

CHEMWATCH 5093-30
Version No:4
CD 2008/4 Page 5 of 19
Section 6 - ACCIDENTAL RELEASE MEASURES
treated naturalorganic -particulatewood fibre - pillow treated naturalorganic -particulatesorbent clay - DGC: Not effective where ground cover is denseR; Not reusableI: Not incinerableP: Effectiveness reduced when rainyRT:Not effective where terrain is ruggedSS: Not for use within environmentally sensitive sitesW: Effectiveness reduced when windy Reference: Sorbents for Liquid Hazardous Substance Cleanup and Control; R.W Melvold et al: Pollution Technology Review No. 150: Noyes Data Corporation 1988.
• Clear area of personnel and move upwind.
• Alert Fire Brigade and tell them location and nature of hazard.
• May be violently or explosively reactive.
• Wear breathing apparatus plus protective gloves.
• Prevent, by any means available, spillage from entering drains or water course.
• Consider evacuation (or protect in place).
• No smoking, naked lights or ignition sources.
• Increase ventilation.
• Stop leak if safe to do so.
• Water spray or fog may be used to disperse /absorb vapour.
• Contain spill with sand, earth or vermiculite.
• Use only spark-free shovels and explosion proof equipment.
• Collect recoverable product into labelled containers for recycling.
• Absorb remaining product with sand, earth or vermiculite.
• Collect solid residues and seal in labelled drums for disposal.
• Wash area and prevent runoff into drains.
• If contamination of drains or waterways occurs, advise emergency services.
continued.
EVIC 853-859A SPRAYTHANE TEXTURED POLYURETHANE PART A
Chemwatch Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 26-Sep-2008

CHEMWATCH 5093-30
Version No:4
CD 2008/4 Page 6 of 19
Section 6 - ACCIDENTAL RELEASE MEASURES
PROTECTIVE ACTIONS FOR SPILL
From IERG (Canada/Australia)Isolation Distance PROTECTIVE ACTION ZONE is defined as the area in which people are at risk of harmful exposure. This zone assumes that random changes in wind direction confines the vapour plume to an area within 30 degrees oneither side of the predominant wind direction, resulting in a crosswind protective action distance equalto the downwind protective action distance.
PROTECTIVE ACTIONS should be initiated to the extent possible, beginning with those closest to the spill and working away from the site in the downwind direction. Within the protective action zone a level ofvapour concentration may exist resulting in nearly all unprotected persons becoming incapacitated andunable to take protective action and/or incurring serious or irreversible health effects.
INITIAL ISOLATION ZONE is determined as an area, including upwind of the incident, within which a high probability of localised wind reversal may expose nearly all persons without appropriate protection tolife-threatening concentrations of the material.
SMALL SPILLS involve a leaking package of 200 litres (55 US gallons) or less, such as a drum (jerrican or box with inner containers). Larger packages leaking less than 200 litres and compressed gas leaking froma small cylinder are also considered "small spills".
LARGE SPILLS involve many small leaking packages or a leaking package of greater than 200 litres, such as a cargo tank, portable tank or a "one-tonne" compressed gas cylinder.
Guide 128 is taken from the US DOT emergency response guide book.
IERG information is derived from CANUTEC - Transport Canada.
EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING GUIDELINES (ERPG)
The maximum airborne concentration below which it is believed that nearly all individuals could be exposed
for up to one hour WITHOUT experiencing or developing irreversible or other serious effects or symptoms which could impair an individual's ability to take other than mild, transient adverse effects without perceiving a clearly defined odour is: American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) Ingredients considered according to the following cutoffs continued.
EVIC 853-859A SPRAYTHANE TEXTURED POLYURETHANE PART A
Chemwatch Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 26-Sep-2008

CHEMWATCH 5093-30
Version No:4
CD 2008/4 Page 7 of 19
Section 6 - ACCIDENTAL RELEASE MEASURES
where percentage is percentage of ingredient found in the mixture Personal Protective Equipment advice is contained in Section 8 of the MSDS.
Section 7 - HANDLING AND STORAGE
PROCEDURE FOR HANDLING
• Containers, even those that have been emptied, may contain explosive vapours.
• Do NOT cut, drill, grind, weld or perform similar operations on or near containers.
Contains low boiling substance:
Storage in sealed containers may result in pressure buildup causing violent rupture of containers not rated
appropriately.
• Check for bulging containers.
• Vent periodically
• Always release caps or seals slowly to ensure slow dissipation of vapours.
• DO NOT allow clothing wet with material to stay in contact with skin.
The tendency of many ethers to form explosive peroxides is well documented. Ethers lacking non-methyl hydrogen atoms
adjacent to the ether link are thought to be relatively safe
• DO NOT concentrate by evaporation, or evaporate extracts to dryness, as residues may contain explosive peroxides
with DETONATION potential.
• Any static discharge is also a source of hazard.
• Before any distillation process remove trace peroxides by shaking with excess 5% aqueous ferrous sulfate solution
or by percolation through a column of activated alumina.
• Distillation results in uninhibited ether distillate with considerably increased hazard because of risk of
peroxide formation on storage.
• Add inhibitor to any distillate as required.
• When solvents have been freed from peroxides by percolation through columns of activated alumina, the absorbed
peroxides must promptly be desorbed by treatment with polar solvents such as methanol or water, which should then be
disposed of safely.
• Electrostatic discharge may be generated during pumping - this may result in fire.
• Ensure electrical continuity by bonding and grounding (earthing) all equipment.
• Restrict line velocity during pumping in order to avoid generation of electrostatic discharge (<=1 m/sec until
fill pipe submerged to twice its diameter, then <= 7 m/sec).
• Avoid splash filling.
• Do NOT use compressed air for filling discharging or handling operations.
• Avoid all personal contact, including inhalation.
• Wear protective clothing when risk of exposure occurs.
• Use in a well-ventilated area.
• Prevent concentration in hollows and sumps.
• DO NOT enter confined spaces until atmosphere has been checked.
• Avoid smoking, naked lights, heat or ignition sources.
• When handling, DO NOT eat, drink or smoke.
• Vapour may ignite on pumping or pouring due to static electricity.
• DO NOT use plastic buckets.
• Earth and secure metal containers when dispensing or pouring product.
• Use spark-free tools when handling.
• Avoid contact with incompatible materials.
• Keep containers securely sealed.
• Avoid physical damage to containers.
• Always wash hands with soap and water after handling.
• Work clothes should be laundered separately.
• Use good occupational work practice.
• Observe manufacturer's storing and handling recommendations.
continued.
EVIC 853-859A SPRAYTHANE TEXTURED POLYURETHANE PART A
Chemwatch Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 26-Sep-2008

CHEMWATCH 5093-30
Version No:4
CD 2008/4 Page 8 of 19
Section 7 - HANDLING AND STORAGE
• Atmosphere should be regularly checked against established exposure standards to ensure safe working conditions.
SUITABLE CONTAINER
• Packing as supplied by manufacturer.
• Plastic containers may only be used if approved for flammable liquid.
• Check that containers are clearly labelled and free from leaks.
• For low viscosity materials (i) : Drums and jerry cans must be of the non-removable head type. (ii) : Where a can
is to be used as an inner package, the can must have a screwed enclosure.
• For materials with a viscosity of at least 2680 cSt. (23 deg. C)
• For manufactured product having a viscosity of at least 250 cSt. (23 deg. C)
• Manufactured product that requires stirring before use and having a viscosity of at least 20 cSt (25 deg. C)
(i) : Removable head packaging;
(ii) : Cans with friction closures and
(iii) : low pressure tubes and cartridges may be used.
• Where combination packages are used, and the inner packages are of glass, there must be sufficient inert
cushioning material in contact with inner and outer packages
• In addition, where inner packagings are glass and contain liquids of packing group I there must be sufficient
inert absorbent to absorb any spillage, unless the outer packaging is a close fitting moulded plastic box and the
substances are not incompatible with the plastic.
STORAGE INCOMPATIBILITY
• Glycol ethers may form peroxides under certain conditions.
• In the presence of strong bases or the salts of strong bases, at elevated temperatures, the potential exists for
runaway reactions.
• Contact with aluminium should be avoided; release of hydrogen gas may result- will corrode scratched aluminium
surfaces.
• Avoid reaction with oxidising agents.
STORAGE REQUIREMENTS
• Store in original containers in approved flame-proof area.
• No smoking, naked lights, heat or ignition sources.
• DO NOT store in pits, depressions, basements or areas where vapours may be trapped.
• Keep containers securely sealed.
• Store away from incompatible materials in a cool, dry well ventilated area.
• Protect containers against physical damage and check regularly for leaks.
• Observe manufacturer's storing and handling recommendations.
Section 8 - EXPOSURE CONTROLS / PERSONAL PROTECTION
EXPOSURE CONTROLS
Source
EMERGENCY EXPOSURE LIMITS
continued.
EVIC 853-859A SPRAYTHANE TEXTURED POLYURETHANE PART A
Chemwatch Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 26-Sep-2008

CHEMWATCH 5093-30
Version No:4
CD 2008/4 Page 9 of 19
Section 8 - EXPOSURE CONTROLS / PERSONAL PROTECTION
MATERIAL DATA
» Sensory irritants are chemicals that produce temporary and undesirable side-effects on the eyes, nose or throat.
Historically occupational exposure standards for these irritants have been based on observation of workers'
responses to various airborne concentrations. Present day expectations require that nearly every individual should
be protected against even minor sensory irritation and exposure standards are established using uncertainty factors
or safety factors of 5 to 10 or more. On occasion animal no-observable-effect-levels (NOEL) are used to determine
these limits where human results are unavailable. An additional approach, typically used by the TLV committee (USA)
in determining respiratory standards for this group of chemicals, has been to assign ceiling values (TLV C) to
rapidly acting irritants and to assign short-term exposure limits (TLV STELs) when the weight of evidence from
irritation, bioaccumulation and other endpoints combine to warrant such a limit. In contrast the MAK Commission
(Germany) uses a five-category system based on intensive odour, local irritation, and elimination half-life. However
this system is being replaced to be consistent with the European Union (EU) Scientific Committee for Occupational
Exposure Limits (SCOEL); this is more closely allied to that of the USA.
OSHA (USA) concluded that exposure to sensory irritants can:
• cause inflammation
• cause increased susceptibility to other irritants and infectious agents
• lead to permanent injury or dysfunction
• permit greater absorption of hazardous substances and
• acclimate the worker to the irritant warning properties of these substances thus increasing the risk of
overexposure.
INGREDIENT DATA
Odour Threshold Value: 0.06 ppm (detection), 0.13 ppm (recognition) This substance is readily hydrolysed inthe body yielding ethylene glycol monoethyl ether which is a putative reproductive toxin. The TLV-TWA is thought to beprotective against testicular effects.
» For toluene:Odour Threshold Value: 0.16-6.7 (detection), 1.9-69 (recognition)NOTE: Detector tubes measuring in excess of 5 ppm, are available.
High concentrations of toluene in the air produce depression of the central nervous system (CNS) in humans.
Intentional toluene exposure (glue-sniffing) at maternally-intoxicating concentration has also produced birthdefects. Foetotoxicity appears at levels associated with CNS narcosis and probably occurs only in those with chronictoluene-induced kidney failure. Exposure at or below the recommended TLV-TWA is thought to prevent transientheadache and irritation, to provide a measure of safety for possible disturbances to human reproduction, theprevention of reductions in cognitive responses reported amongst humans inhaling greater than 40 ppm, and thesignificant risks of hepatotoxic, behavioural and nervous system effects (including impaired reaction time andincoordination). Although toluene/ethanol interactions are well recognised, the degree of protection afforded by theTLV-TWA among drinkers is not known.
Odour Safety Factor(OSF)OSF=17 (TOLUENE).
PERSONAL PROTECTION
EYE
• Safety glasses with side shields.
• Chemical goggles.
• Contact lenses may pose a special hazard; soft contact lenses may absorb and concentrate irritants. A written
policy document, describing the wearing of lens or restrictions on use, should be created for each workplace or
task. This should include a review of lens absorption and adsorption for the class of chemicals in use and an
account of injury experience. Medical and first-aid personnel should be trained in their removal and suitable
equipment should be readily available. In the event of chemical exposure, begin eye irrigation immediately and
remove contact lens as soon as practicable. Lens should be removed at the first signs of eye redness or irritation -
lens should be removed in a clean environment only after workers have washed hands thoroughly. [CDC NIOSH Current
Intelligence Bulletin 59].
continued.
EVIC 853-859A SPRAYTHANE TEXTURED POLYURETHANE PART A
Chemwatch Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 26-Sep-2008

CHEMWATCH 5093-30
Version No:4
CD 2008/4 Page 10 of 19
Section 8 - EXPOSURE CONTROLS / PERSONAL PROTECTION
HANDS/FEET
• Wear chemical protective gloves, eg. PVC.
• Wear safety footwear or safety gumboots, eg. Rubber.
Suitability and durability of glove type is dependent on usage. Factors such as:
• frequency and duration of contact,
• chemical resistance of glove material,
• glove thickness and
• dexterity,
are important in the selection of gloves.
OTHER
• Overalls.
• PVC Apron.
• PVC protective suit may be required if exposure severe.
• Eyewash unit.
• Ensure there is ready access to a safety shower.
• Some plastic personal protective equipment (PPE) (e.g. gloves, aprons, overshoes) are not recommended as they may
produce static electricity.
RESPIRATOR
» Selection of the Class and Type of respirator will depend upon the level of breathing zone contaminant and the
chemical nature of the contaminant. Protection Factors (defined as the ratio of contaminant outside and inside the
mask) may also be important.
** - Continuous-flow or positive pressure demand.
The local concentration of material, quantity and conditions of use determine the type of personal protectiveequipment required. For further information consult site specific CHEMWATCH data (if available), or yourOccupational Health and Safety Advisor.
ENGINEERING CONTROLS
» For flammable liquids and flammable gases, local exhaust ventilation or a process enclosure ventilation system may
be required. Ventilation equipment should be explosion-resistant.
Air contaminants generated in the workplace possess varying "escape" velocities which, in turn, determine the "capture velocities" of fresh circulating air required to effectively remove the contaminant.
solvent, vapours, degreasing etc., evaporating from tank (in still air).
aerosols, fumes from pouring operations, intermittent container filling, low speedconveyer transfers, welding, spray drift,plating acid fumes, pickling (released at lowvelocity into zone of active generation)direct spray, spray painting in shallow booths, drum filling, conveyer loading, crusher dusts,gas discharge (active generation into zone ofrapid air motion) continued.
EVIC 853-859A SPRAYTHANE TEXTURED POLYURETHANE PART A
Chemwatch Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 26-Sep-2008

CHEMWATCH 5093-30
Version No:4
CD 2008/4 Page 11 of 19
Section 8 - EXPOSURE CONTROLS / PERSONAL PROTECTION
Within each range the appropriate value depends on: 1: Room air currents minimal or favourable to capture2: Contaminants of low toxicity or of nuisance value only.
3: Intermittent, low production.
4: Large hood or large air mass in motion Simple theory shows that air velocity falls rapidly with distance away from the opening of a simple extraction pipe.
Velocity generally decreases with the square of distance from the extraction point (in simple cases). Therefore theair speed at the extraction point should be adjusted, accordingly, after reference to distance from thecontaminating source. The air velocity at the extraction fan, for example, should be a minimum of 1-2 m/s (200-400f/min.) for extraction of solvents generated in a tank 2 meters distant from the extraction point. Other mechanicalconsiderations, producing performance deficits within the extraction apparatus, make it essential that theoreticalair velocities are multiplied by factors of 10 or more when extraction systems are installed or used.
Section 9 - PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES
APPEARANCE
White highly flammable liquid with a strong solvent odour; does not mix with
water
PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
Liquid.
Does not mix with water.
Sinks in water.
Section 10 - CHEMICAL STABILITY AND REACTIVITY INFORMATION
CONDITIONS CONTRIBUTING TO INSTABILITY
• Presence of incompatible materials.
• Product is considered stable.
• Hazardous polymerisation will not occur.
For incompatible materials - refer to Section 7 - Handling and Storage.
continued.
EVIC 853-859A SPRAYTHANE TEXTURED POLYURETHANE PART A
Chemwatch Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 26-Sep-2008

CHEMWATCH 5093-30
Version No:4
CD 2008/4 Page 12 of 19
Section 11 - TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION
POTENTIAL HEALTH EFFECTS
ACUTE HEALTH EFFECTS
SWALLOWED
» Swallowing of the liquid may cause aspiration of vomit into the lungs with the risk of haemorrhaging, pulmonary
oedema, progressing to chemical pneumonitis; serious consequences may result.
Signs and symptoms of chemical (aspiration) pneumonitis may include coughing, gasping, choking, burning of the mouth,
difficult breathing, and bluish coloured skin (cyanosis).
Accidental ingestion of the material may be damaging to the health of the individual.
EYE
» Limited evidence or practical experience suggests, that the material may cause moderate eye irritation in a
substantial number of individuals and/or may produce significant ocular lesions which are present twenty-four hours
or more after instillation into the eye(s) of experimental animals. Repeated or prolonged exposure may cause
moderate inflammation (similar to windburn) characterised by a temporary redness of the conjunctiva (conjunctivitis);
temporary impairment of vision and/or other transient eye damage/ulceration may occur.
SKIN
» Skin contact with the material may be harmful; systemic effects may result following absorption.
The material may produce moderate skin irritation; limited evidence or practical experience suggests, that the
material either:

produces moderate inflammation of the skin in a substantial number of individuals following direct contact and/or • produces significant, but moderate, inflammation when applied to the healthy intact skin of animals (for up tofour hours), such inflammation being present twenty-four hours or more after the end of the exposure period.
Skin irritation may also be present after prolonged or repeated exposure; this may result in a form of contact dermatitis (nonallergic). The dermatitis is often characterised by skin redness (erythema) and swelling (oedema)which may progress to blistering (vesiculation), scaling and thickening of the epidermis. At the microscopic levelthere may be intercellular oedema of the spongy layer of the skin (spongiosis) and intracellular oedema of theepidermis.
Open cuts, abraded or irritated skin should not be exposed to this material.
Entry into the blood-stream through, for example, cuts, abrasions, puncture wounds or lesions, may produce systemicinjury with harmful effects. Examine the skin prior to the use of the material and ensure that any external damageis suitably protected.
INHALED
» Inhalation of vapours may cause drowsiness and dizziness. This may be accompanied by narcosis, reduced alertness,
loss of reflexes, lack of coordination and vertigo.
Limited evidence or practical experience suggests that the material may produce irritation of the respiratory system,
in a significant number of individuals, following inhalation. In contrast to most organs, the lung is able to
respond to a chemical insult by first removing or neutralising the irritant and then repairing the damage. The
repair process, which initially evolved to protect mammalian lungs from foreign matter and antigens, may however,
produce further lung damage resulting in the impairment of gas exchange, the primary function of the lungs.
Respiratory tract irritation often results in an inflammatory response involving the recruitment and activation of
many cell types, mainly derived from the vascular system.
Acute effects from inhalation of high concentrations of vapour are pulmonary irritation, including coughing, with
nausea; central nervous system depression - characterised by headache and dizziness, increased reaction time,
fatigue and loss of co-ordination.
The use of a quantity of material in an unventilated or confined space may result in increased exposure and an
irritating atmosphere developing.
Before starting consider control of exposure by mechanical ventilation.
CHRONIC HEALTH EFFECTS
» On the basis, primarily, of animal experiments, concern has been expressed that the material may produce
carcinogenic or mutagenic effects; in respect of the available information, however, there presently exists
continued.
EVIC 853-859A SPRAYTHANE TEXTURED POLYURETHANE PART A
Chemwatch Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 26-Sep-2008

CHEMWATCH 5093-30
Version No:4
CD 2008/4 Page 13 of 19
Section 11 - TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION
inadequate data for making a satisfactory assessment.
There is sufficient evidence to provide a strong presumption that human exposure to the material may result inimpaired fertility on the basis of: - clear evidence in animal studies of impaired fertility in the absence of toxiceffects, or evidence of impaired fertility occurring at around the same dose levels as other toxic effects but whichis not a secondary non-specific consequence of other toxic effects.
There is sufficient evidence to provide a strong presumption that human exposure to the material may result indevelopmental toxicity, generally on the basis of:- clear results in appropriate animal studies where effects have been observed in the absence of marked maternaltoxicity, or at around the same dose levels as other toxic effects but which are not secondary non-specificconsequences of the other toxic effects.
Limited evidence suggests that repeated or long-term occupational exposure may involving organs or biochemical systems.
TOXICITY AND IRRITATION
» unless otherwise specified data extracted from RTECS - Register of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances.
» The material may cause skin irritation after prolonged or repeated exposure and may produce a contactdermatitis (nonallergic). This form of dermatitis is often characterised by skin redness (erythema) andswelling the epidermis. Histologically there may be intercellular oedema of the spongy layer (spongiosis)and intracellular oedema of the epidermis.
For ethylene glycol:Ethylene glycol is quickly and extensively absorbed through the gastrointestinal tract. Limited informationsuggests that it is also absorbed through the respiratory tract; dermal absorption is apparently slow.
Following absorption, ethylene glycol is distributed throughout the body according to total body water. Inmost mammalian species, including humans, ethylene glycol is initially metabolised by alcohol.
dehydrogenase to form glycolaldehyde, which is rapidly converted to glycolic acid and glyoxal by aldehydeoxidase and aldehyde dehydrogenase. These metabolites are oxidised to glyoxylate; glyoxylate may be furthermetabolised to formic acid, oxalic acid, and glycine. Breakdown of both glycine and formic acid cangenerate CO2, which is one of the major elimination products of ethylene glycol. In addition to exhaled CO2,ethylene glycol is eliminated in the urine as both the parent compound and glycolic acid. Elimination ofethylene glycol from the plasma in both humans and laboratory animals is rapid after oral exposure;elimination half-lives are in the range of 1-4 hours in most species tested.
Respiratory Effects. Respiratory system involvement occurs 12-24 hours after ingestion of sufficientamounts of ethylene glycol and is considered to be part of a second stage in ethylene glycol poisoningsymptoms include hyperventilation, shallow rapid breathing, and generalized pulmonary edema with calciumoxalate crystals occasionally present in the lung parenchyma. Respiratory system involvement appears to bedose-dependent and occurs concomitantly with cardiovascular changes. Pulmonary infiltrates and otherchanges compatible with adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) may characterise the second stage ofethylene glycol poisoning Pulmonary oedema can be secondary to cardiac failure, ARDS, or aspiration of gastric contents. Symptoms related to acidosis such as hyperpnea and tachypnea are frequently observed;however, major respiratory morbidities such as pulmonary edema and bronchopneumonia are relatively rare andusually only observed with extreme poisoning (e.g., in only 5 of 36 severely poisoned cases).
Cardiovascular Effects. Cardiovascular system involvement in humans occurs at the same time as respiratorysystem involvement, during the second phase of oral ethylene glycol poisoning, which is 12- 24 hours afteracute exposure. The symptoms of cardiac involvement include tachycardia, ventricular gallop enlargement. Ingestion of ethylene glycol may also cause hypertension or hypotension, which may progress tocardiogenic shock. Myocarditis has been observed at autopsy in cases of people who died following acuteingestion of ethylene glycol . As in the case of respiratory effects, cardiovascular involvement occurswith ingestion of relatively high doses of ethylene glycol.
Nevertheless, circulatory disturbances are a rare occurrence, having been reported in only 8 of 36 severelypoisoned cases .Therefore, it appears that acute exposure to high levels of ethylene glycol can causeserious cardiovascular effects in humans. The effects of a long-term, low-dose exposure are unknown.
Gastrointestinal Effects. Nausea, vomiting with or without blood, pyrosis, and abdominal cramping and painare common early effects of acute ethylene glycol ingestion. Acute effects of ethylene glycol ingestion inone patient included intermittent diarrhea and abdominal pain, which were attributed to mild colonicischaemia; severe abdominal pain secondary to colonic stricture and perforation developed 3 months afteringestion, and histology of the resected colon showed birefringent crystals highly suggestive of oxalatedeposition.
Musculoskeletal Effects. Reported musculoskeletal effects in cases of acute ethylene glycol poisoning have continued.
EVIC 853-859A SPRAYTHANE TEXTURED POLYURETHANE PART A
Chemwatch Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 26-Sep-2008

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Version No:4
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included diffuse muscle tenderness and myalgias associated with elevated serum creatinine phosphokinaselevels, and myoclonic jerks and tetanic contractions associated with hypocalcaemia.
Hepatic Effects. Central hydropic or fatty degeneration, parenchymal necrosis, and calcium oxalate crystalsin the liver have been observed at autopsy in cases of people who died following acute ingestion ofethylene glycol.
Renal Effects. Adverse renal effects after ethylene glycol ingestion in humans can be observed during thethird stage of ethylene glycol toxicity 24-72 hours after acute exposure. The hallmark of renal toxicity isthe presence of birefringent calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals deposited in renal tubules and theirpresence in urine after ingestion of relatively high amounts of ethylene glycol. Other signs ofnephrotoxicity can include tubular cell degeneration and necrosis and tubular interstitial inflammation. Ifuntreated, the degree of renal damage caused by high doses of ethylene glycol progresses and leads tohaematuria, proteinuria, decreased renal function, oliguria, anuria , and ultimately renal failure. Thesechanges in the kidney are linked to acute tubular necrosis but normal or near normal renal function can return with adequate supportive therapy.
Metabolic Effects. One of the major adverse effects following acute oral exposure of humans to ethyleneglycol involves metabolic changes. These changes occur as early as 12 hours after ethylene glycol exposure.
Ethylene glycol intoxication is accompanied by metabolic acidosis which is manifested by decreased pH andbicarbonate content of serum and other bodily fluids caused by accumulation of excess glycolic acid. Othercharacteristic metabolic effects of ethylene glycol poisoning are increased serum anion gap, increasedosmolal gap, and hypocalcaemia. Serum anion gap is calculated from concentrations of sodium, chloride, andbicarbonate, is normally 12-16 mM, and is typically elevated after ethylene glycol ingestion due toincreases in unmeasured metabolite anions (mainly glycolate).
Neurological Effects: Adverse neurological reactions are among the first symptoms to appear in humans afterethylene glycol ingestion. These early neurotoxic effects are also the only symptoms attributed tounmetabolised ethylene glycol. Together with metabolic changes, they occur during the period of 30 minutesto 12 hours after exposure and are considered to be part of the first stage in ethylene glycolintoxication. In cases of acute intoxication, in which a large amount of ethylene glycol is ingested over avery short time period, there is a progression of neurological manifestations which, if not treated, maylead to generalized seizures and coma. Ataxia, slurred speech, confusion, and somnolence are common duringthe initial phase of ethylene glycol intoxication as are irritation, restlessness, and disorientation.
Cerebral edema and crystalline deposits of calcium oxalate in the walls of small blood vessels in the brainwere found at autopsy in people who died after acute ethylene glycol ingestion.
Effects on cranial nerves appear late (generally 5-20 days post-ingestion), are relatively rare, andaccording to some investigators constitute a fourth, late cerebral phase in ethylene glycol intoxication.
Clinical manifestations of the cranial neuropathy commonly involve lower motor neurons of the facial andbulbar nerves and are reversible over many months.
Reproductive Effects: Reproductive function after intermediate-duration oral exposure to ethylene glycolhas been tested in three multi-generation studies (one in rats and two in mice) and several shorter studies(15-20 days in rats and mice). In these studies, effects on fertility, foetal viability, and malereproductive organs were observed in mice, while the only effect in rats was an increase in gestationalduration.
Developmental Effects: The developmental toxicity of ethylene glycol has been assessed in several acute-duration studies using mice, rats, and rabbits. Available studies indicate that malformations, especiallyskeletal malformations occur in both mice and rats exposed during gestation; mice are apparently moresensitive to the developmental effects of ethylene glycol. Other evidence of embyrotoxicity in laboratoryanimals exposed to ethylene glycol exposure includes reduction in foetal body weight.
Cancer: No studies were located regarding cancer effects in humans or animals after dermal exposure toethylene glycol.
Genotoxic Effects: Studies in humans have not addressed the genotoxic effects of ethylene glycol. However,available in vivo and in vitro laboratory studies provide consistently negative genotoxicity results forethylene glycol.
2-ETHOXYETHYL ACETATE:» unless otherwise specified data extracted from RTECS - Register of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances.
Inhalation (rat) LC50: 12100 mg/m³/8 h Dermal (rabbit):420mg(open)- Mild continued.
EVIC 853-859A SPRAYTHANE TEXTURED POLYURETHANE PART A
Chemwatch Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 26-Sep-2008

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Version No:4
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Section 11 - TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION
Dermal (rabbit) LD50: 10500 mg/kgInhalation (rat) TCLo: 50 ppm/6 h» The material may cause skin irritation after prolonged or repeated exposure and may produce a contactdermatitis (nonallergic). This form of dermatitis is often characterised by skin redness (erythema) andswelling epidermis. Histologically there may be intercellular oedema of the spongy layer (spongiosis) andintracellular oedema of the epidermis.
Exposure to the material for prolonged periods may cause physical defects in the developing embryo(teratogenesis).
TOLUENE:» unless otherwise specified data extracted from RTECS - Register of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances.
Dermal (rabbit) LD50: 12124 mg/kg» The material may cause skin irritation after prolonged or repeated exposure and may produce a contactdermatitis (nonallergic). This form of dermatitis is often characterised by skin redness (erythema) andswelling the epidermis. Histologically there may be intercellular oedema of the spongy layer (spongiosis)and intracellular oedema of the epidermis.
For toluene:Acute ToxicityHumans exposed to intermediate to high levels of toluene for short periods of time experience adversecentral nervous system effects ranging from headaches to intoxication, convulsions, narcosis, and death.
Similar effects are observed in short-term animal studies.
Humans - Toluene ingestion or inhalation can result in severe central nervous system depression, and inlarge doses, can act as a narcotic. The ingestion of about 60 mL resulted in fatal nervous systemdepression within 30 minutes in one reported case.
Constriction and necrosis of myocardial fibers, markedly swollen liver, congestion and haemorrhage of thelungs and acute tubular necrosis were found on autopsy.
Central nervous system effects (headaches, dizziness, intoxication) and eye irritation occurred followinginhalation exposure to 100 ppm toluene 6 hours/day for 4 days.
Exposure to 600 ppm for 8 hours resulted in the same and more serious symptoms including euphoria, dilatedpupils, convulsions, and nausea . Exposure to 10,000-30,000 ppm has been reported to cause narcosis anddeathToluene can also strip the skin of lipids causing dermatitisAnimals - The initial effects are instability and incoordination, lachrymation and sniffles (respiratoryexposure), followed by narcosis. Animals die of respiratory failure from severe nervous system depression.
Cloudy swelling of the kidneys was reported in rats following inhalation exposure to 1600 ppm, 18-20hours/day for 3 daysSubchronic/Chronic Effects:Repeat doses of toluene cause adverse central nervous system effects and can damage the upper respiratorysystem, the liver, and the kidney. Adverse effects occur as a result from both oral and the inhalationexposures. A reported lowest-observed-effect level in humans for adverse neurobehavioral effects is 88 ppm.
Humans - Chronic occupational exposure and incidences of toluene abuse have resulted in hepatomegaly andliver function changes. It has also resulted in nephrotoxicity and, in one case, was a cardiac sensitiserand fatal cardiotoxin.
Neural and cerebellar dystrophy were reported in several cases of habitual "glue sniffing." Anepidemiological study in France on workers chronically exposed to toluene fumes reported leukopenia andneutropenia. Exposure levels were not given in the secondary reference; however, the average urinaryexcretion of hippuric acid, a metabolite of toluene, was given as 4 g/L compared to a normal level of 0.6g/LAnimals - The major target organs for the subchronic/chronic toxicity of toluene are the nervous system,liver, and kidney. Depressed immune response has been reported in male mice given doses of 105 mg/kg/dayfor 28 days. Toluene in corn oil administered to F344 male and female rats by gavage 5 days/week for 13weeks, induced prostration, hypoactivity, ataxia, piloerection, lachrymation, excess salivation, and body continued.
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Issue Date: 26-Sep-2008

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Section 11 - TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION
tremors at doses 2500 mg/kg. Liver, kidney, and heart weights were also increased at this dose andhistopathologic lesions were seen in the liver, kidneys, brain and urinary bladder. The no-observed-adverseeffect level (NOAEL) for the study was 312 mg/kg (223 mg/kg/day) and the lowest-observed-adverse effectlevel (LOAEL) for the study was 625 mg/kg (446 mg/kg/day) .
Developmental/Reproductive ToxicityExposures to high levels of toluene can result in adverse effects in the developing human foetus. Severalstudies have indicated that high levels of toluene can also adversely effect the developing offspring inlaboratory animals.
Humans - Variable growth, microcephaly, CNS dysfunction, attentional deficits, minor craniofacial and limbabnormalities, and developmental delay were seen in three children exposed to toluene in utero as a resultof maternal solvent abuse before and during pregnancyAnimals - Sternebral alterations, extra ribs, and missing tails were reported following treatment of ratswith 1500 mg/m3 toluene 24 hours/day during days 9-14 of gestation. Two of the dams died during theexposure. Another group of rats received 1000 mg/m3 8 hours/day during days 1-21 of gestation. No maternaldeaths or toxicity occurred, however, minor skeletal retardation was present in the exposed fetuses. CFLPMice were exposed to 500 or 1500 mg/m3 toluene continuously during days 6-13 of pregnancy. All dams died atthe high dose during the first 24 hours of exposure, however none died at 500 mg/m3. Decreased foetalweight was reported, but there were no differences in the incidences of skeletal malformations or anomaliesbetween the treated and control offspring.
Absorption - Studies in humans and animals have demonstrated that toluene is readily absorbed via the lungsand the gastrointestinal tract. Absorption through the skin is estimated at about 1% of that absorbed bythe lungs when exposed to toluene vapor.
Dermal absorption is expected to be higher upon exposure to the liquid; however, exposure is limited by therapid evaporation of toluene .
Distribution - In studies with mice exposed to radiolabeled toluene by inhalation, high levels ofradioactivity were present in body fat, bone marrow, spinal nerves, spinal cord, and brain white matter.
Lower levels of radioactivity were present in blood, kidney, and liver. Accumulation of toluene hasgenerally been found in adipose tissue, other tissues with high fat content, and in highly vascularisedtissues .
Metabolism - The metabolites of inhaled or ingested toluene include benzyl alcohol resulting from thehydroxylation of the methyl group. Further oxidation results in the formation of benzaldehyde and benzoicacid. The latter is conjugated with glycine to yield hippuric acid or reacted with glucuronic acid to formbenzoyl glucuronide. o-cresol and p-cresol formed by ring hydroxylation are considered minor metabolitesExcretion - Toluene is primarily (60-70%) excreted through the urine as hippuric acid. The excretion ofbenzoyl glucuronide accounts for 10-20%, and excretion of unchanged toluene through the lungs alsoaccounts for 10-20%. Excretion of hippuric acid is usually complete within 24 hours after exposure.
CARCINOGEN
toluene
International Agency for Research on Cancer REPROTOXIN
toluene
SKIN
2- ethoxyethyl
continued.
EVIC 853-859A SPRAYTHANE TEXTURED POLYURETHANE PART A
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Issue Date: 26-Sep-2008

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Section 12 - ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION
This material and its container must be disposed of as hazardous waste.
Section 13 - DISPOSAL CONSIDERATIONS
• Containers may still present a chemical hazard/ danger when empty.
• Return to supplier for reuse/ recycling if possible.
Otherwise:• If container can not be cleaned sufficiently well to ensure that residuals do not remain or if the container cannot be used to store the same product, then puncture containers, to prevent re-use, and bury at an authorised landfill.
• Where possible retain label warnings and MSDS and observe all notices pertaining to the product.
Legislation addressing waste disposal requirements may differ by country, state and/ or territory. Each user must refer to laws operating in their area. In some areas, certain wastes must be tracked.
A Hierarchy of Controls seems to be common - the user should investigate:• Reduction,• Reuse• Recycling• Disposal (if all else fails)This material may be recycled if unused, or if it has not been contaminated so as to make it unsuitable for its intended use. If it has been contaminated, it may be possible to reclaim the product by filtration, distillation or some other means. Shelf life considerations should also be applied in making decisions of this type. Note that properties of a material may change in use, and recycling or reuse may not always be appropriate.
• DO NOT allow wash water from cleaning or process equipment to enter drains.
• It may be necessary to collect all wash water for treatment before disposal.
• In all cases disposal to sewer may be subject to local laws and regulations and these should be considered first.
• Where in doubt contact the responsible authority.
• Recycle wherever possible.
• Consult manufacturer for recycling options or consult local or regional waste management authority for disposal if no suitable treatment or disposal facility can be identified.
• Dispose of by: Burial in a licenced land-fill or Incineration in a licenced apparatus (after admixture with suitable combustible material).
• Decontaminate empty containers. Observe all label safeguards until containers are cleaned and destroyed.
Section 14 - TRANSPORTATION INFORMATION
Labels Required: FLAMMABLE LIQUIDHAZCHEM: 3[Y]E Shipping Name:PAINT RELATED MATERIAL (including paint thinning or Air Transport IATA:
ICAO/IATA Class:
Maritime Transport IMDG:
IMDG Class:
continued.
EVIC 853-859A SPRAYTHANE TEXTURED POLYURETHANE PART A
Chemwatch Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 26-Sep-2008

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Version No:4
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Section 14 - TRANSPORTATION INFORMATION
Shipping Name: PAINT (including paint, lacquer, enamel,stain, shellac solutions, varnish, polish, liquid fillerand liquid lacquer base) or PAINT RELATED MATERIAL(including paint thinning or reducing compound) Section 15 - REGULATORY INFORMATION
POISONS SCHEDULE: S5
REGULATIONS
Evic 853-859A Spraythane Textured Polyurethane Part A (CAS: None):
No regulations applicable
2-ethoxyethyl acetate (CAS: 111-15-9) is found on the following regulatory lists; Australia Exposure StandardsAustralia Hazardous SubstancesAustralia Inventory of Chemical Substances (AICS)Australia National Pollutant InventoryAustralia Standard for the Uniform Scheduling of Drugs and Poisons (SUSDP) - Appendix E (Part 2)Australia Standard for the Uniform Scheduling of Drugs and Poisons (SUSDP) - Appendix F (Part 3)Australia Standard for the Uniform Scheduling of Drugs and Poisons (SUSDP) - Appendix IAustralia Standard for the Uniform Scheduling of Drugs and Poisons (SUSDP) - Schedule 6GESAMP/EHS Composite List of Hazard Profiles - Hazard evaluation of substances transported by shipsIMO IBC Code Chapter 17: Summary of minimum requirementsIMO MARPOL 73/78 (Annex II) - List of Noxious Liquid Substances Carried in BulkOECD Representative List of High Production Volume (HPV) Chemicals toluene (CAS: 108-88-3) is found on the following regulatory lists; Australia - Australian Capital Territory - Environment Protection Regulation: Ambient environmental standards (Domestic water supply - organic compounds) Australia - Australian Capital Territory - Environment Protection Regulation: Pollutants entering waterways taken to cause environmental harm (Aquatic habitat) Australia - Australian Capital Territory Environment Protection Regulation Ecosystem maintenance - Organic chemicals - Non-pesticide anthropogenic organics Australia - Australian Capital Territory Environment Protection Regulation Pollutants entering waterways - Australia Exposure StandardsAustralia Hazardous SubstancesAustralia High Volume Industrial Chemical List (HVICL)Australia Illicit Drug Reagents/Essential Chemicals - Category IIIAustralia Inventory of Chemical Substances (AICS)Australia National Pollutant InventoryAustralia Standard for the Uniform Scheduling of Drugs and Poisons (SUSDP) - Appendix E (Part 2)Australia Standard for the Uniform Scheduling of Drugs and Poisons (SUSDP) - Appendix F (Part 3)Australia Standard for the Uniform Scheduling of Drugs and Poisons (SUSDP) - Appendix IAustralia Standard for the Uniform Scheduling of Drugs and Poisons (SUSDP) - Schedule 5Australia Standard for the Uniform Scheduling of Drugs and Poisons (SUSDP) - Schedule 6GESAMP/EHS Composite List of Hazard Profiles - Hazard evaluation of substances transported by shipsIMO IBC Code Chapter 17: Summary of minimum requirementsIMO MARPOL 73/78 (Annex II) - List of Noxious Liquid Substances Carried in BulkIMO Provisional Categorization of Liquid Substances - List 1: Pure or technically pure productsInternational Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) CarcinogensOECD Representative List of High Production Volume (HPV) ChemicalsUnited Nations Convention Against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances - Table IIUnited Nations List of Precursors and Chemicals Frequently used in the Illicit Manufacture of Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances Under International Control - Table II WHO Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality - Guideline values for chemicals that are of health significance in Section 16 - OTHER INFORMATION
REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH GUIDELINES
» Established occupational exposure limits frequently do not take into consideration
reproductive end points that are clearly below the thresholds for other toxic effects.
Occupational reproductive guidelines (ORGs) have been suggested as an additional
standard. These have been established after a literature search for reproductive no-
observed-adverse effect-level (NOAEL) and the lowest-observed-adverse-effect-level
(LOAEL). In addition the US EPA's procedures for risk assessment for hazard
identification and dose-response assessment as applied by NIOSH were used in the creation
of such limits. Uncertainty factors (UFs) have also been incorporated.
continued.
EVIC 853-859A SPRAYTHANE TEXTURED POLYURETHANE PART A
Chemwatch Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 26-Sep-2008

CHEMWATCH 5093-30
Version No:4
CD 2008/4 Page 19 of 19
Section 16 - OTHER INFORMATION
» These exposure guidelines have been derived from a screening level of risk assessmentand should not be construed as unequivocally safe limits. ORGS represent an 8-hour time-weighted average unless specified otherwise.
CR = Cancer Risk/10000; UF = Uncertainty factor:TLV believed to be adequate to protect reproductive health:LOD: Limit of detectionToxic endpoints have also been identified as:D = Developmental; R = Reproductive; TC = Transplacental carcinogenJankovic J., Drake F.: A Screening Method for Occupational ReproductiveAmerican Industrial Hygiene Association Journal 57: 641-649 (1996).
» Classification of the preparation and its individual components has drawn on official and authoritative sources as well as independent review by the Chemwatch Classification committee using available literature references.
A list of reference resources used to assist the committee may be found at: www.chemwatch.net/references.
» The (M)SDS is a Hazard Communication tool and should be used to assist in the Risk Assessment. Many factors determine whether the reported Hazards are Risks in the workplace or other settings. Risks may be determined by reference to Exposures Scenarios. Scale of use, frequency of use and current or available engineering controls must be considered.
This document is copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purposes ofprivate study, research, review or criticism, as permitted under the CopyrightAct, no part may be reproduced by any process without written permission fromCHEMWATCH. TEL (+61 3) 9572 4700. Issue Date: 26-Sep-2008Print Date: 3-Dec-2008

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